My Pop Dragonz  Title: My Father’s Dragon

Author: Ruth Stiles Gannet

Rating: 🍦(46/50)

Age range: 1st-3rd graders

Summary

Armed with only Bubblegum, 2 dozen lollipops, a package of rubber bands, some black rubber boots, a compass, a toothbrush, toothpaste, 6 magnifying glasses, a very sharp jackknife, a hair brush, a comb, 7 hair ribbons of different colors, and an empty grain bag that says “Cranberry”, Elmer Elevator (called my”My Father” during the book) embarks on a journey to rescue an overworked baby dragon. But it isn’t easy. He must face tigers, lions, rhinos, monkeys, gorillas, and many more frightening creatures.

This beloved tale was originally published in 1948 and has never been out of print since. If you liked this book, you may want to read the sequels Elmer and the Dragon and The Dragons of Blueland. There is also a beautiful map of Tangaria and Wild Island included. Map of Tangeria and Wild Island


Thoughts (for when you’re done reading, contains spoilers)

Overall, I thought this was a hilarious and light read. It’s kind of nice to take a break from middle school books. Less complex plot, more humor, not a lot of heavy topics…

My favorite character was Elmer. He was quite the resourceful one. (almost reminds me of Mullet Fingers from Hoot) I also liked the cat, but I wish she was able to come along on the big adventure. And come to think of it, I also really liked the baby dragon. Oh, who am I kidding, all the characters were great!

My favorite part was when Elmer and the Baby Dragon flew off together. I can’t wait to read the sequel!

But just one question: What does “bum cack” mean? At the end of the book, while Elmer and the Baby Dragon were flying away, all the animals below shout:

“Bum Cack! Bum Cack! We dread out nagon! I mean, we need our dragon!”

I looked up the phrase on the internet and got nothing. I also asked both of my parents and they didn’t know what I meant either. So if any of you guys have any idea what the heck this means, please let me know down in the comments section: I’m guessing it one of those old-timey words.

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See you later!

-Katie K